Export to Excel in Dynamics 365 Business Central v19

Overview

Relax folks, Microsoft didn’t remove the Export to Excel function in Dynamics 365 Business Central starting from v19. It’s just been moved.

The Difference

Old Version (or versions prior to Business Central v19):

Starting from Business Central v19:

Why The Change?

The direction from Microsoft is to integrate more and more Microsoft 365 application into Business Central. Having a organized place where you can export the data into other Microsoft 365 application is one small step in that direction.

Conclusion

Yes, we’re getting a ton of “The export to Excel function is gone. PLEASE HELP!” questions.

How to Enter Beginning Bank Balance for Dynamics 365 Business Central v18 and Above

Overview

On Dynamics 365 Business Central release 18, Microsoft made significant changes to the bank reconciliation features. Most of the articles and videos on entering beginning bank balances are still based on the older versions Dynamics 365 Business Central or Dynamics NAV.

Just thought I would share with the community on setting up your beginning bank balances if you’re moving to Business Central from your legacy accounting /ERP software

The goal is to have your bank balance match your G/L account. Just posting whatever is in your G/L to your bank is not the way to go and you’ll run into trouble later in future reconciliations.

Do it right initially will save you tons of trouble later.

Here are the steps to enter the beginning balances of your bank when you’re migrating from your legacy ERP/accounting software to Dynamics 365 Business Central.

What You Need

As with anything, preparation is key. There are a few things you need before entering your beginning bank balance.

Assuming you’re going live with Business Central on December 1st, they are:

  1. Previous bank reconciliation before you go live. For example, if you plan to go live on December 1st, you’ll need the bank statement from November 30th.
  2. A list of outstanding checks and transactions not cleared by the bank up to November 30th
  3. Your reconciled G/L bank balance from your old legacy system. This means you need to do one last bank reconciliation from your legacy system up to November 30th

How do you know if you have everything put ready? Here’s a simple formula:

Your G/L balance for your cash/bank account as of November 30th
+/- Outstanding bank transactions that’s not been cleared
= Amount on the Bank Statement as of November 30th

For example:

G/L Balance as of 11/30 = 10,000
Outstanding uncleared checks and deposits as of 11/30 = 2,000
The bank statement that you got from the bank on 11/30 should be 12,000.

If the above formula is not true, do not proceed! Get it right so it can save you headaches down the road.

How This is Going to Work

Once you post the entries via General Journal (make sure the Account Type is Bank Account), run your first bank reconciliation as November 30th, or the period before you go live.

When you run your bank reconciliation for November 30th, manually enter the previous bank statement total in the Bank Statement Line section. DO NOT run the bank feed import for this period as nothing you import can be reconciled against.

Click on Matching -> Match Manually to match the entry that you’ve made for the Beginning Bank G/L Balance entry.

Once the matching is done for the beginning entry, you can post the reconciliation.

For your bank reconciliation for the following period, all of the unreconciled transactions will display for you to clear against.

Conclusion

Now you may be asking “But wait Alex, we won’t get your bank statement until a few days after we go live!”

That’s okay!

You don’t need your bank beginning balances as soon as you go live. We typically get the bank beginning balances (and other non-operation related balances) setup about a week after go live.

Accepting Dynamics 365 Business Central as a Mediocre Solution

Overview

I’ll admit that I’m a bit of an old school person when it comes to implementing Dynamics 365 Business Central (formerly called Dynamics NAV).

I believe when you make a decision to implement Dynamics 365 Business Central for your business, the transition should be smooth with minimal disruption.

In fact, these transition often make your process better as it sorts out (and eliminates) processes that are convoluted. It forces everyone within the company to at least take a hard look at what they’re doing and why they’re doing it.

I believe the transition process should be fully planned out and accommodations be made based on the individual circumstances for each company.

Furthermore, during the implementation process, there should be full understanding of:

  • What’s being done and what changes are going to occur
  • What’s being delivered by your Business Central partner
  • What’s being prepared by your own staff

But lately, I’m noticing a disturbing trend in our industry.

Disturbance in the Business Central Force.

When I speak to people that have implemented Business Central, they’re less than enthusiastic about going live with the software.

Digging deeper, I find a lot of common issues on why these business were less than happy with what they got. Here’s a list of the few common comments:

  • Received little to no training (online training was not sufficient)
  • No audit or testing on data being converted
  • Balances transferred over did not match
  • Disconnect between the users and the implementers
  • No response for requests for enhancements or modifications
  • No response for questions they have about the usage of the system

I think the cause of this is the current trend for implementing cloud based software is the automated or templated approach.

The idea is you list out all of the steps that are required to implement a new software, in this case, Dynamics 365 Business Central and you systematize it. In another words, it make it repeatable so anyone can go through the checklist and implement the ERP software.

The goal is so the solution center can hire anyone off the street at a discount, give them minimal training, and just have them follow the template with the customer to get them running in Business Central.

All this so the solution can offered at a lower priced to attract new customers who has no idea what’s going on.

Unfortunately, these low cost implementation trend is a race to the bottom. There’s always going to be the guy that can offer something at a lower price.

In most cases, to lower the price of implementation is to cut corners.

Sure, you can start using Dynamics 365 Business Central if all of your requirements are part of the template (which is the bare minimum). For anything else, you have to wait or you’ll need to figure out how to go around it on your own. The person that’s hired or contracted to help you will certainly not know the answer.

Accepting Less Than Mediocracy

I mean, I wouldn’t be as shocked if the people I spoke to received mediocre service and support. I’m more shocked that people just choose to accept less than mediocre service and support.

Some of the problems the people I spoke to seemed indifferent  to their situation:

  • Accept that requests for modifications takes weeks (sometimes months) to deliver
  • Accept no answers to their questions
  • Accept that they should hire internal staff to maintain Business Central
  • Accept the inconsistencies of working with contractors to the solution center
  • Accept their numbers are off right from the beginning
  • Accept the lack of training
  • Accept that you cannot have a deeper discussion about your business problems and how it can be addressed

I can go on and on, but I keep wondering…  At what point in time was this considered acceptable? Did I miss something?

Everyone talks about the destination. Nobody talks about the process.

Companies are excited about Business Central. It is the best mid-market ERP software. The number of improvements Microsoft has made is astounding. This is not including the strong integration with the existing Office 365 suite.

It’s exciting even for me, as a partner, to see what a fully deployed solution can do. We use it internally, and let me tell you, it has made deployment of these features a whole lot easier and a whole lot palatable. Not to mention how quickly and how organized we can operate as a cohesive team.

No one really pays attention to the question “exactly how do we get there”? Sure if you get a check list and go down the list to see what’s on the template and what’s being delivered, but is your business transformation really off of a templated checklist that you didn’t even create?

Conclusion

I’m not sure why companies are so accepting of their situation.

Do they feel that they’re trapped because they’re scared of what will happen to their data  in the cloud (which is managed by Microsoft) if they switch  software vendors?

Do they feel like it’s expensive to get a new vendor in?  Too much hassle since they’ve gone through it once already?

Do they feel that these problems are just temporary and they’ll just magically go away?

Or worst, do they feel every software vendor is the same and “that’s just how it is”?

Whatever it is, I sincerely hope that this is just a phase. And I hope we, as an industry, can do better.

The One Huge Mistake You’re Making When Setting Up WMS for Dynamics 365 Business Central

Overview

I mentioned In my previous article that there are multiple ways of setting up warehouse management.

In reality, however, there really are two ways: there’s the option of setting up your warehouse with Directed Pick and Put-away…and the wrong way.

In almost all companies where bin location management (or warehouse management using wireless scanners) is desired, setting up your warehouse with Directed Pick and Put-away will be the correct decision.

The Setup

Assuming you’ve done the necessary prep work in your warehouse for a warehouse management system, you will then need to configure the existing Locations in Business Central to be warehouse enabled.

Basically, to enable a location for Direct Pick and Put-aways, you will need to run a process called Create Warehouse Location from the Location List.

Then, you will need to enter the Location you wish to enable the Directed Pick and Put-away for, in addition, the Adjustment Bin.

When you click on the Create Warehouse Location process, it will do the following:

  1. Enable Directed Pick and Put-away on the Location Card
  2. Move all inventory in the Location to the Adjustment Bin setup in the Location Card

The purpose of the Create Warehouse Location process is that it will move your inventory quantities to the Adjustment Bin.

Moving the items to the Adjustment Bin allows you to do a physical count using the Warehouse Physical Inventory Journal or the Warehouse Item Journal to move the items from the adjustment bins into the regular physical bins in the warehouse.

Any remainder inventory quantities not accounted for using the warehouse journals will be counted as Positive or Negative Adjustments when you run the Calculate Warehouse Adjustment process from the Item Journal.

The Problem

For the location (or warehouse) to be able to properly process orders with Directed Pick and Put-away enabled, you need to associate each Bin with a Bin Type Code and a Zone Code.

However, when you’re setting up the Zones and the Bins for the Location for the first time, you will NOT be able to define a Zone Code or a Bin Type Code against the Bin.

If you try to define a Zone and a Bin Type for the Adjustment Bin, you will counter an error saying the Zone Code must be blank.

The reason you’re getting this error is because you need the Directed Pick and Put-away marked as true on the Location Card in order to fill in the Zone Code and the Bin Type Code.

But you can’t mark the Directed Pick and Put-away as true if there are inventory quantities in the location. Which is enabled by running th Create Warehouse Location process.

And you shouldn’t run the Create Warehouse Location unless the Adjustment Bin is setup with the proper Zone Code and the Bin Type Code.

We have quite the problem here…

What if I Run the Process Without Zone and Bin Type?

Yes, you can run the process without defining the Zone and the Bin Type on the Bins, but that’s not what you should do. In fact, that’s where most people get in serious trouble.

After the Create Warehouse Location process is finished, you’ll want to go in and fill in some additional bins or begin setting up other bins in the warehouse.

However, if you go into the Bin screen to setup additional bins, you’ll encounter this error:

That’s correct. In order to add additional bins in a location with Direct Pick and Put-away enabled, BC requires you to have a Zone Code and  Bin Type Code.

Now you’re screwed.

If you continue using WMS in the current setup, you’ll have some bins with Zones and some bins without Zones.

When you do adjustments, it will not properly move items from the bins with Zones and bins without Zones, leaving you with tons and tons of inventory quantity problems that are too many to list in this article. That’s pretty much a nightmare.

You’re now in a world of hurt.

The Correct Way to Enable Warehouse Location

Before you run the Create Warehouse Location process, make sure you set up all of the Zones and the Bin Type codes with the zones.

How how do we do this if the system is blocking us from doing the right thing?

The answer is by forcing it using Rapidstart.

When you create the Bins, you need to utilize RapidStart Configuration Package to FORCIBLY fill in the Adjustment Bin Code WITH Zone Code and Bin Type Code.

The 4 fields you need on the Bin table are:

  • Location Code
  • Bin Code
  • Zone Code
  • Bin Type Code

This way, the bins will be inserted with the proper Zone Code and Bin Type Code when the adjustment entries are created.

Processing future transactions within the warehouse will flow normally and all in the world will be well again.

Conclusion

This is the conundrum when enabling a Location to be Directed Pick and Put-away. During the setup of the warehouse, you’re not able to use Zones. After the location has been converted to have full WMS, you’re required to use Zones.

While I’m not sure if Microsoft will address this issue in the future, at least, now you’ll know how to fix it.

That being said, having your warehouse move off of a manual-based process to an automated (or computerized) one, in itself, is often not an easy task as it requires buy-in from the warehouse users and reconfiguring the warehouse process so it all flows so flows in a smooth and consistent way…but this will be a topic for a separate article.

Different Flavors of Warehouse Management in Dynamics 365 Business Central

Overview

Dynamics 365 Business Central (formerly known as Dynamics NAV) is a comprehensive ERP system. As such, it has many features that caters the different needs of businesses, for example, manufacturing, service managment, CRM, distribution, etc. Each one of these functional areas can be configured a number of ways depending on the needs of the business. During my time working at AP Commerce, there are never any shortages of investigating different setups based on on the needs of a business.

What you think you need may not be what you need. Yes, I did write that in one stroke without flinching. One of the most common requests from potential and current users of Business Central (Dynamics NAV) is they want to effectively manage their warehouse using warehouse management system.

The question I’m always tempted to ask is: “What type of Warehouse Management are you looking for?” Of course I never ask that question because this will cause more confusion than I can handle.

So why am I tempted to ask that question? Again, in each functional area in Business Central (Dynamics NAV), there are a number of ways to set it up. Having said that, here are different ways to setup WHM for your business. Note that Warehouse Management can be defined per warehouse, so every warehouse that you have can be setup differently.

NOTICE! The purpose of this article is not to give you a complete step by step instruction on BC (NAV) warehouse management, the purpose is to give you some knowledge on different ways to go about implementing WHM so you can have some knowledge and input when you speak with your Dynamics NAV partner on it.

Considerations

One word of caution is when implement ANY warehouse management system, you have to make sure your warehouse is organized, efficient, and accurate. A lot of companies make the mistake of buying a warehouse management software because the warehouse is too messy.

DON’T DO IT!

Software, in general, is designed to streamline your operation and speeed up the processing. If your warehouse is disorganized, inefficient, and not accurate, any warehouse management software will make it worst. You will be disorganized, inefficient, and inaccurate at a faster rate. Garbage in, garbage out.

The Flavors

Here’s a picture of the Warehouse Mangement setup in Dynamics 365 Business Central (Dynamics NAV):

Bin Mandatory

From initial look, if you just want to keep track of the items on the bins, this is the option for you, right? Unfortunately, no… I’ve never been in an implementation where we just place a checkbox on this field without at least enabling Ship/Pick or Receive/Put-away.

Just checking this on enables you to keep track of items by bin, however, one of the main problem with just checking this on is that you specify bin on the purchase and sales order. So if you have an item that’s on 2 different bins, you have to split the sales/purchase lines. Not only that, if you want to move an item from one bin to another, you have to use the item reclass journal, which effectively creates Item Ledger, value entry, and the general ledger. Doing physical inventory may also create a lot of excessive entries that will bog you down when you use the Item Ledger to do any sales and purchase analysis.

Pros: Allows you to tag bin code to an inventory transaction

Cons: Have to split sales and purchase line so the quantity matches the bins on the item ledger Creates a lot of excessive entries to key ledger tables Makes life harder than it has to

You Typically See This Setup for: No one. You’re better off using the Shelf/Bin No. field on the item card. This is how NAV 2.0 handles bins. We’re in Business Central now, no sense in going backwards when there are better options.

Require Shipment/Receive

Just enabling these option allows you to use the Warehouse Ship/Receive function. The main purpose of the Warehouse Ship/Receive is to allow the user to batch the sales orders by a container or a trailer going out per carrier. This option is typically enabled for companies that ships and receives by containers. The warehouse shipment is typically used to generate your bill of lading for the trucker.

Without turning on Pick and Put-away, I would NOT recommend turning on Bin Mandatory. You would encounter the same problem that I’ve stated above. For smaller companies, spliting up the warehouse process may not be necessary.

Pros: Allows you to Ship and Receive by container or bill of lading Warehouse Manager can control what he/she wants to ship based on released orders instead of the order processor printing out a pick ticket The warehouse process is separated out from the order fulfillment process (so warehouse can do their own posting) More accurate inventory can be achieved since inventory can be relieved when it’s shipped

Cons: Not recommend to enable Bin Mandatory (same cons as above) Not necessary if you do not wish the warehouse people to be posting stuff

You Typically See This Setup For: Large item distributors or manufacturers that want split out their warehouse processing, but does not care of bin contents Companies that ship and receive by containers but do not want to split their items into bins in the warehouse.

Require Pick/Put-away (No Require Shipment/Receive)

This is an option is what I would like to call the mini-fullblown warehouse management. This options provides the flexibility for the warehouse staff to create warehouse put-away and warehouse picks as they see fit, they can also assign these warehouse documents to the appropriate people to do the processing. Another way to use this feature is to allow the order fulfillment people to create the pick request to the warehouse without actually printing a pick ticket.

The draw back of using this option is that you’re only allowed to have one sales/purchase order per put-away/pick. This means that you won’t be able to group the orders together in one warehouse shipment (as stated above) to generate a consolidated bill of lading. Same goes for the receiving side, you won’t be able to receive by container or by bill of lading.

This option works perfectly if you want to enable Bin Mandatory. The Inventory Pick/Put-away document generated will allow you to split lines at the warehouse document level so you can put the items away in their proper bin without having to modify the original purchase or sales order.

Pros: Allows you to easily process inventory transactions by Bin Warehouse Manager can control what he/she wants to ship based on released orders instead of the order processor printing out a pick ticket The warehouse process is separated out from the order fulfillment process (so warehouse can do their own posting) More accurate inventory can be achieved since inventory can be relieved when it’s shipped

Cons: Not able to group orders together into one shipment or receipt Not be able to use ADCS (wireless handheld)

You Typically See This Setup For: Companies that would like to organize their warehouse by bin, but does not have the manpower to go Directed Pick/Put-away.

Directed Pick and Put-away

This is the full deal. It has all of the benefits that I’ve listed above. Group order together by warehouse shipment and be able to pick and put away by bins. Not only that, this allows you to use ADCS (wireless handheld device) so your warehouse staff and record warheouse transactions using the handheld.

All good right?

Not exactly. It really depends on what your company needs. All these features sounds cool, but if your business does not need it, trying to shove it in may create more work and processes than necessary. There are a couple of steps where the user need to interface with a computer when you enable Directed Pick and Put-away:
1. Create the sales order
2. Create warehouse shipment
3. Create pick
4. Register pick
5. Post warehouse shipment
6. Post sales order

Whereas if you do not enable any of these, the steps would be:
1. Create the sales order
2. Post the sales order

Conclusion

It’s highly recommended that you get with your Dynamics 365 Business Central (Dynamics NAV) partner and discuss which setup is right for your business RIGHT NOW with consideration for future growth. If you try to implement everything without any consideration for your current operation, the operational efficiency will decrease. This is because of the increased overhead and maintenance that are required.

Make sure your company have the manpower and the infrastructure to absorb the overhead and maintenance required so the increase in efficiency and accuracy can be realized.

Do not implement some feature just because you like the feature. In most cases, it will be overkill. It’s like buying a size 10 top-of-the line Nike tennis shoes for your 3 year old son and forcing him to walk in it every day. Eventually, he will grow into it. But by the time he grows into it, he’ll develop some other major problems that will cost more money to fix.

Using Gmail Account with SMTP Setup with Dynamics Business Central / Dynamics NAV

Overview

Not all customers uses Office 365 as their e-mail. The other popular option companies use is G Suite from Google.

When you’re trying to setup the SMTP Mail using Gmail accounts in G Suite, you may encounter this error:

The mail system returned the following error: “Failure sending mail.
Unable to read data from the transport connection: net_io_connectionclosed.”.

Resolution

The problem is with how Google detects which application it deems as less secure. If you’re using an application it deems less secure, Google will refuse the connection.

What you’ll need to do is change your settings on Gmail.

On the Less Secure App access, you will need to turn this on.

Conclusion

Now when you go back to your Dynamics 365 Business Central (aka Dynamics NAV) application, you will be able to send the mail from the SMTP settings.

Changing Protection Level to Boost Performance

Overview

Just a quick note about boosting the client performance for full Windows or RTC clients for customers using Dynamics 365 Business Central (aka Dynamics NAV).

This was brought to us by one of our customers that is looking for ways to reduce the lag for their users using the full Windows client.

One of the newer features in Dynamics 365 Business Central (aka Dynamics NAV) is to allow different connections to the data within NAV. This means security is a big issue since you do not want random programs to connect to your financial data.

Changing Protection Level

When you set the Protection Level as the default (EncryptAndSign), every data packet being sent and received are encrypted and authenticated to ensure you are who you are.

This means that when the users are viewing, for example, the customer card, if you disable their user on the Active Directory, they will get kicked out immediately. Yes, even if they’re not sending and receiving any data.

This may cause additional traffic to your data packets being sent and received as it requires additional layers of encryption and signing to ensure the data is legitimate as it ensure the person accessing the data is legitiment.

For users using NAV locally within the company where the server is hosted locally, these kind of security may not be needed.

For our client that’s running Dynamics NAV on-premise, changing Protection Level to None has significantly boosted the Windows client for the end users.

IMPORTANT NOTE!

You should only change this for users that are using NAV locally and are using Windows Login.

Your security is important and you should definitely consult your local security expert before changing this.

Proceed at your own risk!!

Is Inventory Periods Needed to Control Inventory Posting?

Overview

Over the years, I’ve written a lot of articles about inventory and inventory costing. I realize there are some tools that I do not mention that are in the inventory module. This is not because I don’t know about them, it’s because I don’t think companies need them.

Everyone is super busy these days, the last thing people want to do is administrative work. I’m an minimalist when I help our clients setup Dynamics 365 Business Central (Formerly Dynamics NAV).

I believe we should take the simplest route in setup and configuration to get the company up and running. Why? Because the simplest route is usually the easiest route to maintain for the customer ON THEIR OWN going forward.

It’s easy for us consultants, who does this for a living, to recommend all of these cool functions that controls this and that. But what happens when the customer is live and actually using the system in their day to day operation? In addition to their daily workload, now they have to click some buttons in order to properly close?

The new ERP system is supposed to save us steps, not increase them. We, as consultants and developers, often forgets this important goal.

Remembering details to close out the period in the system should be, in my opinion, be kept at a minimum (none if possible).

Making the system more complicated to maintain is not good for anyone.

Let me get into why I’m picking on Inventory Periods…

Why Inventory Periods?

The purpose of the inventory period is to enforce the rule that no item transaction can be posted before the date on the inventory period that is closed.

In this example, you if the check mark for the field Closed is checked, you will not be able to post any transactions prior to 9/30/18 in Dynamics 365 Business Central:

Sounds good right? I mean why would you want people to be able to back date inventory?

Why Not Inventory Periods?

The reason why I don’t advocate using this function is because, as a financial controller or accounting manager, you’re job is already to ensure people do not back date to the prior periods that have been closed.

There are 2 ways to control this in Dynamics 365 Business Central

1. Allow Posting From on the General Ledger Setup

2. Allow Posting From on the User Setup

Both will prevent people from posting into prior periods. IN ADDITION, these functions extends out to other parts of the system that the users should not be back dating into, not just specific to inventory.

You can control who can/cannot post into prior periods with the Allow Posting From on the User Setup screen.

Why do an additional step of closing inventory periods when you already have premade functions that controls when the user can/cannot post into?

But Why Are You Really Not Using Inventory Periods?

Simple, error messages.

Quite simply, error messages freaks people out. I hate them and I suspect you hate them too.

To be able to close out an inventory period, you have to ensure the following:

  1. Run adjust cost, which what you should be doing already. (We typically set this up in the Job Queue so it runs automatically)
  2. Make sure there are no negative inventory. Technically, this shouldn’t happen, but it does.

Negative inventory is something the financial controller would’ve caught when they print their inventory reports for the management or auditors.

All of the restrictions that the Inventory Periods tries to manage is something the accounting manager is already doing in their standard operating procedure.

  • You have the Allow Posting From dates to control when people can back date to.
  • You should be running adjust cost already or it should be setup on the Job Queue to be ran automatically.

    Side Note:
    If users don’t remember to run Adjust Cost, I don’t see how they can remember to close the inventory period.
  • You should be printing inventory reports for management and would’ve caught and resolved any negative inventory problems. If your company does not care about negative inventory (some companies don’t), I doubt you’ll ever use the Inventory Period function anyway.

Conclusion

I do believe Inventory Periods have their uses in certain situations. I just haven’t been convinced yet.

More often than not, I walk into companies with elaborate setups, with Inventory Periods being one of them, that has not been used since the first 1 or 2 periods since the company went live.

Most companies using Dynamics 365 Business Central don’t even know they’re supposed to run the adjust cost process. Adding additional step of inventory periods will not help the situation.

Microsoft likes to add functions to keep track of functions. In my opinion, this makes the system and its maintenance more complicated, which nobody wants. Fortunately, this function is not mandatory.

Keep it simple! Don’t make your life hard!

Game Changing Concept for Cloud ERP with Dynamics 365 Business Central

Overview

One of my personal complaints about any cloud based ERP software the inability to make customizations that your business needs to maintain a competitive edge.

The assumption of a cloud ERP software is that every business should be able to fully utilize the software as the software developers intended. But as we all know in the real world, this is NEVER the case.

The Cloud ERP Problem

As much as software developers tries to develop functions that covers all basis for the users of their software, there will be nuance for each individual businesses and how they operate. This is exponentiated by the fact that their customers will throw out weird curveballs that the user will have to comply, no matter what.

What do you do in these instances? You have make changes to the system or keep track of the changes manually.

In this day and age where products are expected to be ordered in the morning and shipped in the afternoon, there’s no way in hell you can expect the user to keep track of data manually. Worst, the company may have to buy or develop a whole different software just to supplement what the original ERP can’t handle.

Either way, it’s a recipe for disaster.

So now you have a problem, you have a software that is not robust enough to meet your customer’s demands without major workarounds and you have data and processes you have to comply with.

Yeah… It’s not a very good situation…

What Makes Dynamics 365 Business Central Different

One of the main selling points for the old Dynamics NAV (aka Navision) was the ability the user can customize anything they want. Because of this, some very beautiful industry specific and horizontal solutions have been developed without additional integration software. Why? Because it’s built INTO the software.

The ability to modify anything you want is both good and bad and is subject to debate, but at least it’s available should you need it.

When Microsoft announced they’re moving Dynamics NAV to the full cloud and renaming it to Dynamics 365 Business Central, a lot of people kind of assumed we’d be taking away the core essences of what makes NAV great, it’s flexibility.

Then when the product launched, I see this little surprise in the Extension Management screen. The Extension Management screen basically allows you to add/remove any features you want that’s available:

What?! I almost wet my pants when I saw this!

This allows you and/or your NAV partner to make custom extension modifications to your specific Dynamics 365 Business Central deployment!

Not only can you enjoy the great infrastructure of Microsoft cloud, but you’re also able to make customizations to your specific needs?! Microsoft, specifically the Dynamics NAV product team, really hit this thing out of the park.

Still Work to Do

Being able to upload extensions to modify your deployment still has it’s limits.

You will only be able to “extend” on the base application, but you will not be able to actually modify the base code. For example, you will not be able to change how Reservation system works in base NAV, you can only modify around it.

But still, it’s a GREAT first step!

Conclusion

Welp… I’m excited. Cautious, but excited.  Naaa.. I’m just excited…